Buick Encore Owners & Service Manuals

Buick Encore: Supplemental Inflatable Restraints - Description and operation

Buick Encore 2012-2019 Service Manual / Accessories & Equipment / Cellular, Entertainment, and Navigation / Supplemental Inflatable Restraints - Description and operation

Onstar description and operation

This OnStar system consists of the following components:

  • Telematics communication interface control module
  • OnStar three button assembly
  • Microphone
  • Cellular antenna
  • Navigation antenna
  • Bluetooth antenna (If equipped)
  • Back up battery (If equipped)

This system also interfaces with the factory installed vehicle audio system.

Onstar Block Diagram

Fig. 40: Identifying Onstar Block Diagram
Fig. 40: Identifying Onstar Block Diagram

Onstar Block Diagram

Onstar Block Diagram

Telematics Communication Interface Control Module

The telematics communication interface control module is a cellular device that allows the user to communicate data and voice signals over the national cellular network. Power is provided by a dedicated, fused B+ circuit.

Ground is provided through the vehicle wiring harness attached to the module. The ignition state is determined by the telematics communication interface control module through serial data messaging.

Dedicated circuits are used to connect the telematics communication interface control module to a microphone, the button assembly, and to command the status LED. The telematics communication interface control module communicates with the rest of the vehicle over the serial data bus.

The module houses 2 technology systems, one to process GPS data, and another for cellular information. The cellular system connects the OnStar system to the cellular carrier's communication system by interacting with the national cellular infrastructure. The module sends and receives all cellular communications over the cellular antenna and cellular antenna coax. GPS satellites orbiting earth are constantly transmitting signals of their current location. The OnStar system uses the GPS signals to provide location on demand.

The module also has the capability of activating the horn, initiating door lock/unlock, or activating the exterior lamps using the serial data circuits. These functions can be commanded by the OnStar Call Center per a customer request.

OnStar Three Button Assembly

Base Mirror

The OnStar button assembly may be part of the rearview mirror, or a separate, stand alone unit. The button assembly is comprised of 3 buttons and a status LED. The buttons are defined as follows:

  • The answer/end call button, which is black with a white phone icon, allows the user to answer and end calls or initiate speech recognition.
  • The blue OnStar call center button, which displays the OnStar logo, allows the user to connect to the OnStar call center.
  • The emergency button, which displays a white cross with a red background, sends a high priority emergency call to the OnStar call center when pressed.

The telematics communication interface control module supplies 10 volts to the OnStar button assembly on the keypad supply voltage circuit. When pressed, each button completes a circuit across a resistor allowing a specific voltage to be returned to the telematics communication interface control module on the keypad signal circuit. Depending upon the voltage range returned the telematics communication interface control module is able to identify which button has been pressed.

The OnStar status LED is located with the button assembly. The LED is green when the system is ON and operating normally. When the status LED is green and flashing, it is an indication that a call is in progress.

When the LED is red, this indicates a system malfunction is present. In the event there is a system malfunction and the OnStar system is still able to make a call, the LED will flash red during the call.

If the mirror has the rear vision camera display in the mirror, the LED's are then interior to the mirror and controlled via data communication on the Low Speed GMLAN bus from the Telematics Communication Interface Control Module to the mirror.

If the LED does not illuminate, this may indicate that the customers OnStar subscription is not active or has expired. Push the blue OnStar button to connect to an advisor who can then verify the account status.

Each LED is controlled by the telematics communication interface control module over dedicated LED signal circuits. Ground for the LED is provided by the wiring harness attached to the button assembly.

Prismatic Mirror (If Equipped)

The OnStar button assembly is apart of the rearview mirror. The button assembly is comprised of 3 capacitive touch buttons and a status LED. The buttons are defined as follows:

  • The answer/end call button, which is a white driver figure seated with voice signals near it's face, allows the user to answer and end calls or initiate speech recognition.
  • The blue OnStar call center button, which displays the blue OnStar logo, allows the user to connect to the OnStar call center.
  • The emergency button, which displays red letters "SOS" as an illuminated Indicator, sends a high priority emergency call to the OnStar call center when pressed.

The telematics communication interface control module supplies 10 volts to the OnStar button assembly on the keypad supply voltage circuit. When pressed, each button press is processed and completes a circuit across an internal resistor allowing a specific voltage to be returned to the telematics communication interface control module on the keypad signal circuit. Depending upon the voltage range returned the telematics communication interface control module is able to identify which button has been pressed.

The OnStar status LED is located within the mirror near the buttons. The LED is green when the system is ON and operating normally. When the status LED is green and flashing, it is an indication that a call is in progress. When the LED is red, this indicates a system malfunction is present. In the event there is a system malfunction and the OnStar system is still able to make a call, the LED will flash red during the call.

If the LED does not illuminate, this may indicate that the customers OnStar subscription is not active or has expired. Push the blue OnStar button to connect to an advisor who can then verify the account status.

Each LED is controlled by the telematics communication interface control module over dedicated LED signal circuits. Ground for the LED is provided by the wiring harness attached to the button assembly.

Electrochromic Mirror (If Equipped)

The OnStar button assembly is apart of the rearview mirror. The button assembly is comprised of 3 capacitive touch buttons and an error indicator. The buttons are defined as follows:

  • The answer/end call button, which is a white driver figure seated with voice signals near it's face, allows the user to answer and end calls or initiate speech recognition.
  • The blue OnStar call center button, which displays the blue OnStar logo, allows the user to connect to the OnStar call center.
  • The emergency button, which displays red letters "SOS" as an illuminated Indicator, sends a high priority emergency call to the OnStar call center when pressed.

The telematics communication interface control module supplies 10 volts to the OnStar button assembly on the keypad supply voltage circuit. When pressed, each button press is processed and completes a circuit across an internal resistor allowing a specific voltage to be returned to the telematics communication interface control module on the keypad signal circuit. Depending upon the voltage range returned the telematics communication interface control module is able to identify which button has been pressed and illuminate associated indicator above each button.

The OnStar error indicator is located within the mirror above the buttons between the OnStar indicator and emergency "SOS" indicator. All three indicators associated with a button press are illuminated when the system is ON and operating normally. When any indicator is illuminated and flashing, it is an indication that a call is in progress. When the OnStar error indicator is illuminated, this indicates a system malfunction is present. In the event there is a system malfunction and the OnStar system is still able to make a call, the OnStar error indicator will remain illuminated during the call.

If the indicators do not illuminate, this may indicate that the customers OnStar subscription is not active or has expired. Push the blue OnStar button to connect to an advisor who can then verify the account status.

Secondary OnStar Controls

Some vehicles may have an additional button that when pushed can engage the OnStar system. The button may be a symbol of a face with sound waves, or may say MUTE, or be a symbol of a radio speaker with a slash through it.

By engaging the OnStar system with this feature, the user can interact with the system by use of voice commands. A complete list of these commands is supplied in the information provided to the customer. If the information is not available for reference, at any command prompt the user can say "HELP" and the telematics communication interface control module will return an audible list of available commands.

OnStar Microphone

The OnStar, or cellular microphone, can be a part of the rearview mirror assembly, or on some vehicle lines, a separate, stand alone unit. In either case, the telematics communication interface control module supplies approximately 10 volts to the microphone on the cellular microphone signal circuit, and voice data from the user is sent back to the telematics communication interface control module over the same circuit. A cellular microphone low reference circuit or a drain wire provides a ground for the microphone.

Cellular and GPS Antennas

This vehicle will be equipped with one of the following types of antennas:

  • A combination cellular and navigation antenna, which brings the functions of both into a single part
  • A cellular, GPS, and digital radio receiver antenna, which also incorporates the functionality of the digital radio receiver satellite antenna (XM).
  • A cellular, GPS, and digital radio receiver antenna, which also incorporates the AM/FM antenna.

The cellular antenna is the component that allows the OnStar system to send and receive data over airwaves by means of cellular technology. The antenna is connected at the base to a coax cable that plugs directly into the telematics communication interface control module.

The GPS antenna is used to collect the signals of the orbiting GPS satellites. Within the antenna is housed a low noise amplifier that allows for a more broad and precise reception of this data. The antenna is connected at the base to a coax cable that plugs directly into the telematics communication interface control module. The cable also provides a path for DC current for powering the antenna.

The OnStar Call Center also has the capability of communicating with the vehicle during an OnStar call to retrieve the latest GPS location and transmit it to the OnStar Call Center. A history location of the last recorded position of the vehicle is stored in the module and marked as aged, for as long as the module power is not removed. Actual GPS location may take up to 10 minutes to register in the event of a loss of power.

OnStar RemoteLink

OnStar RemoteLink is a mobile app to link mobile devices to a vehicle for limited diagnostics and feature controls. After downloading the app and registering the device, vehicle owners with an eligible vehicle can use their mobile devices to access real-time data from their vehicle and perform specific commands remotely.

All communication between the app and the vehicle is powered by OnStar's advanced connected vehicle technology. An active OnStar account as well as a valid OnStar username and password are required to use the app. The remote commands must be enabled by logging into the user's OnStar account prior to using the app.

Vehicle Control Features

  • Lock/Unlock doors
  • Start vehicle remotely
  • Activate your Horn & Lights
  • Contact an OnStar Advisor, Roadside Assistance or your Preferred Dealer

Available Vehicle Data:

  • Real-time fuel information, including fuel range, fuel remaining, and lifetime MPG
  • Lifetime mileage
  • Remaining oil life
  • Current tire pressure information
  • OnStar account information

Compass Heading

The telematics communication interface module has a compass feature to calculate vehicle direction which is displayed via the instrument panel cluster or designated display. The compass heading is determined by dead reckoning until the GPS 3d fix is established. The dead reckoning is accomplished by using the yaw rate sensors and wheel ticks to determine heading changes from a GPS known heading. The GPS 3d fix heading is determined by the deferential of two locations.

Bluetooth (If Equipped)

Bluetooth wireless technology is a short-range communications technology intended to replace the cables connecting portable and/or fixed devices while maintaining high levels of security. Only vehicles with steering wheel controls will have Bluetooth functionality. In order to utilize the vehicle's Bluetooth system, a Bluetooth equipped cellular phone is required.

The Bluetooth antenna is a small fixed antenna connected directly to the telematics communication interface control module and is used to send and receive signals from a Bluetooth enabled cellular phone. The antenna utilizes no cabling and is not external to the vehicle. The available features and functions are determined by the software within the device being used and the telematics communication interface control module. The operating range of the signal from the vehicle is approximately 30 feet. Note that the operating range is dependent upon the cellular phone being used and battery level of the phone.

With Bluetooth technology customers can experience hands-free calling as their Bluetooth capable cellular phones are wirelessly connected to the vehicle. It will allow customers to place and receive calls using the steering wheel controls and voice recognition. The vehicle audio system will allow you to listen to your call through the vehicle speakers and adjust volume through steering wheel or radio controls.

Not all Bluetooth cellular phones are guaranteed to work with the vehicle's Bluetooth system. Based on the cellular phone's service provider and the manufacturer's implementation of Bluetooth, not all phones support all available Bluetooth functionality. Bluetooth enabled cellular phones will be tested for vehicle compatibility and a feature compatibility list will be provided via the GM Bluetooth website

Bluetooth Features Supported

The following is a list of features supported by the Bluetooth system. Note that not all devices will support all of the listed functions.

  • Automatic reconnection - highest priority phone will automatically be connected to vehicle when vehicle ignition is on
  • Hands-free dialing- via digits, redial, name tags (phone number saved to a nametag via voice recognition)
  • Answering a call
  • Ending a call
  • Mute a Call
  • Rejecting a call - ignore an incoming call
  • Call Waiting
  • Three-way Calling - initiated from hands-free system
  • Send Number During a Call - this is used when calling a menu-driven phone system
  • Transfer a Call - transfer call from vehicle to cellular phone and visa versa
  • Voice Pass-Thru - allow access to the voice recognition commands on the cellular phone

Pairing a Bluetooth Cellular Phone to the Vehicle

In order to use hands-free calling, the cellular phone must be paired to the vehicle. Up to five devices can be paired to the vehicle at one time, but only one can be connected at any given time. To pair a phone, the customer must know how to operate the Bluetooth functionality of their phone. The pairing process must only be done one time for each phone, unless that phone's information is deleted. For safety reasons, the pairing process is disabled while the vehicle is moving.

Once the Bluetooth cellular phone has been paired with vehicle, it will automatically connect to the vehicle when the ignition is on and the device is on. When more than one paired phone is in the vehicle, the phone with the highest priority will be connected. If the cellular phone is in use while getting into the vehicle, the phone can be switched to hands-free mode with the press of a button. In addition, a call in progress can be transferred from the vehicle hands-free mode to the phone to continue the call as the customer exits the vehicle.

Complete pairing instructions are provided in the Vehicle Owners Manual.

Back-up Battery (If Equipped)

IMPORTANT: Do not disconnect the main vehicle battery or remove the OnStar fuse with the ignition key in any position other than OFF. Disconnecting power to the OnStar module in any way while the ignition is ON or with retained accessory power activated may cause activation of the OnStar Back-Up Battery. This action is per design as the back-up battery is designed to provide power to the telematics communication interface control module so an emergency notification call can be made after an event where the main battery is disabled.

Once the Back-Up Battery is activated it will stay on until the power is restored back to the telematics communication interface control module. The telematics communication interface control module naturally chooses the main supply voltage as it's default supply, but if the main supply is removed or lost for any reason the OnStar module will use the Back-Up Battery as a power supply as long as the default supply can not be detected. The back-up battery is not rechargeable and once discharged below 9.5 volts the back-up battery must be replaced.

Certain OnStar equipped vehicles may also be equipped with a back-up battery. The back-up battery is a nonrechargeable, lithium battery intended to provide an auxiliary power source for the telematics communication interface control module in the event where power from the main vehicle battery is lost.

The back-up battery is intended to have a limited life span of approximately 4 years and is designed to maintain an open circuit voltage between 16 V and 9 V throughout this period. This allows the battery to power the basic functions of the telematics communication interface control module for least one 200 second (5 minute) call at the end of the 4 year span, should the main vehicle battery be lost. In the case of a vehicle losing vehicle battery power, OnStar will switch over to the backup battery based on an internal algorithm. It will look for an air-bag deploy, or near-deploy, messages from the SDM. If there are no messages the OnStar module will stay wake for a few minutes longer and monitor the buttons in the mirror. If not pressed, the modules will power down and shut off completely.

The back-up battery is connected to the telematics communication interface control module through the back-up battery positive voltage circuit and back-up battery ground circuit and is protected from a short circuit by means of an internal fuse. In the event the back-up battery, battery positive voltage circuit is shorted to the back-up battery ground circuit or chassis ground, the fuse will open and render the back-up battery permanently inoperable. The status of the back-up battery and its associated wiring is monitored by the telematics communication interface control module.

Audio System Interface

When the OnStar requires audio output, a serial data message is sent to the audio system to mute all radio functions and transmit OnStar originated audio. The OnStar audio is transmitted to the vehicle audio system by a dedicated signal circuit and a low reference circuit.

The audio system will mute and an audible ring will be heard though the speakers if the vehicle receives a call with the radio ON.

On some vehicles, the HVAC blower speed may be reduced when the OnStar system is active to aid in reducing interior noise. When the system is no longer active, the blower speed will return to its previous setting

OnStar Sleep Cycle

The OnStar system uses a unique sleep cycle to allow the system to receive cellular calls while the ignition is in the OFF position and retained accessory power mode has ended. This cycle enables the telematics communication interface control module to perform remote functions, such as door unlock, as commanded over the air by the OnStar Call Center, and to continue to maintain an acceptable level of battery electrical drain.

The OnStar system uses 4 states of readiness, depending upon the type of cellular market the vehicle is in when the ignition is put into the OFF state:

  • High power
  • Low power
  • Sleep
  • Digital standby

The high power state is in effect whenever the ignition is in the ON or RUN position, or retained accessory power is enabled, and the OnStar system is sending or receiving calls or when the system is performing a remote function.

The low power state is in effect when the OnStar system is idle with the ignition in the ON or RUN position, or with retained accessory power enabled.

The sleep state is entered after the vehicle has been shut off and the retained accessory power has timed out while in an analog cellular area. At a predetermined time recorded within the telematics communication interface control module, the system re-enters the low power state to listen for a call from the OnStar Call Center for 1 minute. After this interval, the system will again return to the sleep state for 9 minutes. If a call is sent during the 1 minute interval, the OnStar system will receive the call and immediately go into the high power mode to perform any requested functions. If no call is received during the 1 minute interval, the system will go back into the sleep mode for another 9 minutes. This process will continue for up to 48 hours, after which the OnStar system will turn off until the ignition is turned to the ON or RUN position.

The digital standby power state is entered after the vehicle has been shut off and the retained accessory power has timed out while in a digital cellular area. When in digital standby mode, the OnStar module is able to perform all remote functions as commanded by an OnStar advisor at any time, for a continuous 120 hours.

After 120 hours, the OnStar module will go into sleep mode until a wake up signal from the vehicle is seen by the telematics communication interface control module. If the OnStar module loses the digital cellular signal it will revert to analog mode and follow the standard sleep state (9 minutes OFF, 1 minute standby) based on the time of the GPS signals, this will continue until a digital cellular signal is again received.

If the OnStar system loses battery power while the system is in a standby or sleep mode, the system will remain OFF until battery power is restored and the ignition is turned to the ON or RUN position.

Features

OnStar Personal Calling

The hands free, OnStar personal calling cellular phone feature is an additional feature of the OnStar system.

This feature is embedded within the telematics communication interface control module; however it must be activated by an OnStar advisor. OnStar personal calling operates similar to most hand held cellular phones in that the availability for its usage is based on minutes or units. The customer must have a current OnStar subscription, as this feature cannot be utilized without it. To use OnStar personal calling, the customer must also purchase units (minutes) as outlined in the owners guide provided with the OnStar system. Units begin to deplete, 1 unit is equal to 1 minute, as the customer makes outbound phone calls, answers inbound phone calls, or while connected to the OnStar virtual advisor. In addition, units may also have an expiration date, depending upon the type of units purchased.

Customers have the ability to store telephone numbers within the module, referenced by a nametag for the convenience of frequently dialed numbers. After storing a nametag, the user can dial this number by initiating the OnStar personal calling feature, speaking the word "call," and repeating the nametag assigned.

Turn by Turn Navigation

Turn by Turn Navigation allows the driver to contact OnStar to obtain directions for driving from a current location to a desired location. The Turn by Turn Navigation system stores your planned route and continually checks your position along that route, when you deviate from the planned route, the system will recognize this and prompt the driver with verbal prompts for how to proceed. The driver then responds verbally to direct the system to continue the current routing or to recalculate the route because of a missed turn.

Advisor Record Feature

The Advisor Record Feature allows the user to store any information given during a call with an OnStar Advisor. Recording is activated by pressing the blue OnStar button during a call; pressing the button a second time stops the recording. The stored information can be played back by pressing the phone button on the three button assembly and using the voice command "Advisor Playback".

Deactivated OnStar Accounts

In the event a customer has not renewed their OnStar account after expiration or the account was never activated, OnStar will make a discrete cellular call to the vehicle to deactivate the OnStar system. Before taking this action, customers are notified that the OnStar system in their vehicle will be deactivated unless they elect to renew the account. After the OnStar account has been deactivated, customers will experience the following:

  • The OnStar status LED will not illuminate.
  • The OnStar system will NOT attempt to connect to the OnStar Call Center in the event of a collision or if the vehicle's front air bags deploy for any other reason.
  • An emergency button press will play a demo message indicating the service has been deactivated.
  • An OnStar Call Center button press will connect the customer with a dedicated sales team who can sell an OnStar subscription and reactivate the vehicle. Depending on the type of OnStar hardware in the vehicle, the customer may first hear a demonstration message stating there is no current OnStar subscription for the vehicle, and directing the customer what to do to activate services.
  • OnStar personal calling will not be available, as this feature requires the customer to have a current OnStar account. Attempts to use this feature may result in cellular connection failure messages and the inability to connect to the number dialed.

Certain vehicles that have never had an active OnStar account, or that have been deactivated, may be unable to establish a connection with the OnStar Call Center. When normal published diagnostic procedures do not indicate a possible cause for the no connect concern, the vehicle may have been deactivated. For deactivated vehicles, a no connect response should be considered normal operation. Further diagnosis and subsequent repair is only necessary should the customer elect to become an active OnStar subscriber or renew the account subscription.

OnStar Cellular, GPS, and Diagnostic Limitations

The proper operation of the OnStar System is dependent on several elements outside the components integrated into the vehicle. These include the National Cellular Network Infrastructure, the cellular telephone carriers within the network, and the GPS.

The cellular operation of the OnStar system may be inhibited by factors such as the users range from an analog or digital cellular tower, the state of the cellular carrier's equipment, and the location where the call is placed. Making an OnStar key press in areas that lack sufficient cellular coverage or have a temporary equipment failure will result in either the inability of a call to complete with a data transfer or the complete inability to connect to the OnStar Call Center. The OnStar system may also experience connection issues if the identification numbers for the module, station identification number, electronic serial number or manufacturers electronic ID, are not recognized by the cellular carriers local signal receiving towers.

The satellites that orbit earth providing the OnStar system with GPS data have almost no failures associated with them. In the event of a no GPS concern, the failure will likely lie with the inability of the system to gain GPS signals because of its location, i.e. in a parking structure, hardware failure, or being mistaken with an OnStar call which has reached the Call Center without vehicle data.

During diagnostic testing of the OnStar system, the technician should ensure the vehicle is located in an area that has a clear unobstructed view of the open sky, and preferably, an area where analog or digital cellular calls have been successfully placed. These areas can be found by successfully making an OnStar keypress in a known good OnStar equipped vehicle and confirming success with the OnStar Call Center advisor. Such places can be used as a permanent reference for future OnStar testing.

Mobile Identification Number and Mobile Directory Number

The telematics communication interface control module utilizes 2 numbers for cellular device identification, call routing and connection, a mobile identification number and a mobile directory number. The mobile identification number represents the number used by the cellular carrier for call routing purposes while the mobile directory number represents the number dialed to reach the cellular device.

Operation of the OnStar Speech Recognition Systems

OnStar users communicate with 2 speech recognition systems. Speech recognition allows the user to speak to one computer in the vehicle, and one reached over a phone line. The computer tries to understand the users command, and responds by speaking back, or by taking the appropriate action, e.g. dialing the phone.

  • Personal Calling uses a speech recognition system that resides in the vehicle. When the user presses the phone button, the system states, Ready, and listens for the user's command. The user can speak commands to control the hands-free phone.
  • Virtual advisor is a remote speech recognition system that the caller can access by making a phone call.

    The user connects to virtual advisor by requesting it during personal calling use. The user is then transferred to the virtual advisor server and talks to it via a cellular connection.

The OnStar speech recognition systems use speech technology that is designed to understand a wide range of American English speakers. Although there is no one right way to speak English, the system will work best when users try to modify their pronunciation should they encounter difficulty. Users who do not obtain good results are advised to try the tips and workarounds found in this section.

General Tips for Better Speech Recognition

General Tips for Better Speech Recognition

General Tips for Better Speech Recognition

General Tips for Better Speech Recognition

Radio/audio system description and operation (with monochrome display)

The entertainment system on this vehicle may have several different configurations available to it. To determine the specific configuration of the vehicle, please see the Service Parts ID Label, and refer to RPO Code List (Encore) , RPO Code List (Encore) .

The entertainment system on this vehicle is configured with either a base or an uplevel system. The base and uplevel systems each contain a radio, antenna, speakers, and on some systems an audio amplifier. The uplevel system differs from the base system by providing the customer with enhanced audio system features.

Each item in the list below represents topics covered in detail below.

  • Radio Circuit Operation
  • Information Display and Controls
  • Antenna System
  • Radio Reception
  • Speaker Operation
  • Audio Amplifier (If equipped)
  • Theft Deterrent
  • Bluetooth (UP9) (if equipped)
  • Applications (if equipped)
  • Auxiliary Audio Input Jack (If equipped)
  • USB Port (If equipped)
  • OnStar
  • Multimedia Player Interface Module (If equipped)
  • Steering Wheel Controls (If equipped)
  • Auto Volume Control

Radio Circuit Operation

Radio Power

The radio does not use a discrete ignition feed circuit for power moding. The power mode master provides the system power mode to the radio via serial data messages. The power mode master determines the system power mode by processing power mode information from ignition switch inputs. Serial data power modes supported by the radio are OFF, ACCESSORY, RUN, and CRANK REQUEST.

Radio Grounds

The vehicle harness provides a ground for the radio circuits. The radio may also be case grounded.

Radio Data Link Communication

The radio communicates with other modules via serial data.

Radio Audio Outputs

Each of the audio output channel circuits (+) and (-), at the radio have a DC bias voltage that is approximately one half of battery voltage. The audio being played on the system is produced by a varying AC voltage that is centered around the DC bias voltage on the same circuit. The AC voltage is what causes the speaker cone to move and produce sound. The frequency (Hz) of the AC voltage signal is directly related to the frequency of the input (audio source playing) to the audio system. Both the DC bias voltage and the AC voltage signals are needed for the audio system to properly produce sound.

Remote Enable Output

The remote enable circuit is a discrete 12 V signal supplied to infotainment system components when the radio is producing audio, needs the front display on, needs video entertainment system components on, or needs to produce chimes. This signal is used to control the power state of the components. There is no output on radio the remote enable circuit when the vehicle is in the CRANK powermode, this is to minimize current consumption from the attached modules and also to avoid audio pops during crank events.

Information Display and Controls - Display RPO UAG

Radio/HVAC Communications

Fig. 41: Radio/HVAC Communication Diagram
Fig. 41: Radio/HVAC Communication Diagram

Radio/HVAC Communications

Radio/HVAC Communications

The radio controls and information display are separate components from the radio. Each component is supplied battery voltage and ground. The radio uses the wake up circuit to control the power state of the display. The radio controls communicate with the info display module through the LIN serial data circuit. Display backlighting dimming level, graphical data, and radio control inputs are communicated over the CGI data circuits between the display and the radio.

The HVAC controls are a separate component from the radio controls. HVAC data for controls and status indicators is communicated between the HVAC controls and the HVAC control module with a separate LIN serial data circuit. HVAC status screen information from the HVAC control module is transmitted to the radio on the GMLAN serial data circuit. The radio then displays the desired screen information on the info display using the video data circuits.

Antenna System

Multi-Band Antenna

The multi-band antenna is located on the roof of the vehicle. This type of antenna may be used with the AM/FM radio, but is primarily for cellular and GPS signals, if the vehicle has these features. Keep this antenna clear of snow and ice build up for clear reception. If the vehicle has a sunroof, the performance of the system may be affected if the sunroof is open. Loading items onto the roof of the vehicle can interfere with the performance of the system, ensure the multi-band antenna is not obstructed.

Radio Reception

AM/FM Radio Signal

The radio signal is sent from a broadcast station and is then received by an antenna. The strength of the signal received depends on the following:

  • The power output (wattage) of the broadcasting station
  • The location of the vehicle (or receiver) relative to the broadcast tower.
  • Height of the broadcast antenna
  • Height of the receiving antenna
  • Obstacles between the tower and the receiver
  • Atmospheric conditions
  • What band (AM or FM) the station is broadcasting
  • Type of antenna and the ground plane

Radio Data System (RDS)

The RDS feature is available only on FM stations that broadcast RDS information. This system relies upon receiving specific information from these stations and only works when the information is available. While the radio is tuned to an FM-RDS station, the station name or call letters display. RDS data is carried in what is known as a "subcarrier". A subcarrier is a frequency that the FM broadcaster is authorized to use to send data that is not audible in the main audio program.

RDS functions will only work with FM broadcast stations that are broadcasting RDS data. Not all FM Broadcast stations broadcast RDS data or offer all of the RDS services.

The information displayed is dependent upon the information broadcast by the particular station. The information may vary greatly between stations. RDS functions may not work properly when reception is weak, reception is of poor quality, or RDS is not implemented properly by the FM Broadcaster. In some cases, a radio station broadcasting incorrect information may cause the RDS features of the radio to appear to work improperly.

With RDS, the radio can do the following:

  • Display text information such as: station identification, type of programming, and general information (artist and song title, station messages, call in phone numbers, etc.).
  • Seek to stations broadcasting the selected type of programming
  • Receive announcements concerning local and national emergencies
  • Receive alert warnings of local or national emergencies. When an alert announcement comes on the current radio station, ALERT! displays. You will hear the announcement, even if the volume is low or a CD is playing. If a CD is playing, play stops during the announcement. Alert announcements cannot be turned off. ALERT! is not affected by tests of the emergency broadcast system. This feature is not supported by all RDS stations.

Speaker Operation

Speakers turn electrical energy into mechanical energy to move air, using a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The electromagnet is energized when the radio or amplifier (if equipped) delivers current to the voice coil on the speaker. The voice coil will form a north and south pole that will cause the voice coil and the speaker cone to move in relation to the permanent magnet. The current delivered to the speaker is rapidly changing alternating current (A/C). This causes the speaker cone to move in two directions producing sound.

Audio Amplifier (If equipped)

Amplifier Interface

A fused battery voltage circuit provides the main amplifier power. A switched 12 V output from the radio is used to control the power - state of the amplifier. To respond quickly to audio input and control signals, the amplifier is ON in all vehicle power modes except OFF and CRANK Request. The internal amplifier bridges are fully powered and unmuted when the amplifier receives the switched 12 V input.

Amplifier Operation

The purpose of the amplifier is to increase the power of a voltage or current signal. The output signal of an amplifier may consist of the same frequencies as the input signal or it may consist of only a portion of the frequencies as in the case of a subwoofer or midrange speaker. The radio creates a low level stereo audio output signal, which is sent at the user-defined volume level to the audio amplifier. The audio amplifier amplifies the signal and sends it to the appropriate speakers. Each of the audio output channel circuits (+) and (-), from the amplifier have a DC bias voltage that is approximately one half of battery voltage. The audio being played on the system is produced by a varying AC voltage that is centered around the DC bias voltage on the same circuit.

The AC voltage is what causes the speaker cone to move and produce sound. The frequency (Hz) of the AC voltage signal is directly related to the frequency of the input (audio source playing) to the audio system. Both the DC bias voltage and the AC voltage signals are needed for the audio system to properly produce sound.

Theft Deterrent

The radio theft deterrent system is intended to disable or limit radio functionality if incorrect vehicle information is received by the radio. The radio disables functionality if the VIN information received by the radio does not match the VIN information that has been learned by the radio. The radio receives this information via serial data. A possible cause of incorrect VIN info could be the radio was originally installed in another vehicle.

The radio has the following theft operating modes as part of the theft deterrent system:

  • Normal Mode: The radio has learned a correct VIN sequence and the VIN information received via serial data matches the learned VIN sequence. In this mode the radio has full functionality.
  • No VIN Mode: The radio has not received or learned a correct VIN sequence. In this mode the radio has limited functionality.
  • Theft Detected Mode: The radio has learned a correct VIN sequence and the VIN information received via serial data does NOT match the learned VIN sequence. In this mode the radio may be disabled or have limited functionality. The radio display will indicate that theft protection is active.

Bluetooth (UP9) (If equipped)

Bluetooth wireless technology is a short-range communications technology intended to replace the cables connecting portable and/or fixed devices while maintaining high levels of security. The operating range of the signal is approximately 30 feet.

The available features and functions are determined by the type of device and the software within the devices being used. For a feature or function to operate, it must be supported in both devices.

The first connection between devices is established through a process called pairing. In order to pair two devices, a password (passkey) has to be exchanged between the two devices. One device will generate the password, the other device accepts the password to complete the process. Once the devices are paired, future connections between the devices will occur automatically when the devices are on and within range of each other.

The Bluetooth hardware is internal to the radio. The radio supports streaming of data (music, voice, information) from cellular phones and other mobile devices that support those features. The radio may also be capable of interfacing with cellular phones for hands-free features.

  • The device must be paired to the radio to use the available Bluetooth feature(s). The pairing process must only be performed once for each device, unless that device's information is deleted.
  • Up to five devices can be paired to the system, but only one can be connected at any given time.
  • Streaming Audio allows playing music from the mobile device wirelessly. Music stored on the mobile device can be viewed and controlled from the display.
  • To stream audio from a mobile device, the device must be unlocked, and any additional applications should be closed.

Refer to the vehicle owners manual, supplements, and the device manufacturers information for pairing instructions.

Applications (If equipped)

When the system is equipped with Bluetooth , the system may be capable of using applications, commonly referred to as apps.

The term application refers to any piece of software that works on a system (hardware) that is being operated by it's own software. Applications are typically small software programs which uses the hardware to perform a specific task, as opposed to operating the entire system.

  • For an application to be used, it must be installed on both the vehicle infotainment system and a compatible mobile device.
  • The device must be connected to the system. this may be done wirelessly via Bluetooth , or via the vehicle USB port. Refer to the device manufacturers information for the proper connection method.
  • When the device is connected, the application on the radio is used to remotely access and control the application on the mobile device.
  • The application must work correctly on the device to work with the vehicle infotainment system.
  • The user may be required to log-in to the application on the mobile device before using the application from the vehicle controls.
  • Using applications will use the device's data plan.
  • The device must be unlocked, and any additional applications should be closed.

Refer to the owner's manual and supplements for information on mobile devices, control, and operation.

Auxiliary Audio Input Jack (If equipped)

The infotainment system may have a 3.5mm (1/8 in.) auxiliary audio input jack. The auxiliary audio input jack may interface directly with the radio, or be connected to the infotainment system via a Multimedia Player Interface Module. When a portable audio playback device is connected to the auxiliary jack, an internal switch detects the connection and the radio will switch to AUX as the audio source. Audio signals from the device are sent to the radio from the auxiliary jack via the left, right, and common audio signal circuits.

  • When a device is first connected to the 3.5mm (1/8 in.) input jack the infotainment system automatically switches to that device. If an auxiliary device has already been connected, press the AUX or CD/AUX button to select the device.
  • Playback of an audio device that is connected to the 3.5mm jack can only be controlled using the controls on the device.
  • The volume control on the device may need to be adjusted to ensure sufficient playback volume through the infotainment system.

USB Port (If Equipped)

The infotainment system may have a USB connector. The USB connector may interface directly with the radio, or be connected to the infotainment system via a Multimedia Player Interface Module. The USB connector supports both USB standards 1.1 and 2.0.

USB Supported Devices:

  • USB Flash Sticks (Thumb Drives)
  • Portable USB Hard Drives
  • Portable Digital Media Players ( iPOD, ZUNE, etc)

Depending on the USB device, some devices may not be recognized, or some features/functions may not be able to be controlled with the radio controls. USB HUB devices are not supported.

Multimedia Player Interface Module (MPIM) (If Equipped)

The vehicle may be equipped with a Multimedia Player Interface Module. This module can receive signals via the USB connector or the auxiliary audio input jack. This module receives the incoming signals , then sends the signals as analog audio inputs to the radio.

To allow the radio controls to be used to control portable media devices (USB, Bluetooth, iPOD, ZUNE, etc); the MPIM translates the USB signals to GMLAN signals to allow the bi-directional communication between the radio and the device. Depending on the device, some devices may not be recognized, or some features/functions may not be able to be controlled with the radio controls. USB HUB devices are not supported.

OnStar (If equipped)

When OnStar is activated, a serial data message is sent to the radio that activates a software program. When the software begins its process, the fade goes to the front, Bass and Treble are set to the mid range, the outputs are mono, and the audio source is OnStar. OnStar takes priority over any other audio source. All of these actions are preset values stored in the radio.

For additional OnStar information, refer to OnStar Description and Operation.

Steering Wheel Controls (If equipped)

Some audio functions are available using the steering wheel controls. The steering wheel controls duplicate the function of the primary controls available on the radio.

For additional information on steering wheel controls, refer to Steering Wheel Controls Description and

Operation .

Auto Volume Control

With auto volume control, the audio system will adjust automatically to make up for road and wind noise as you drive, by increasing the volume as vehicle speed increases. To use auto volume control, set the volume at the desired level, and then select either Low, Medium, or High. To turn auto volume control off, select the Off screen button.

Radio/audio system description and operation (with color display)

The entertainment system on this vehicle may have several different configurations available to it. To determine the specific configuration of the vehicle, please see the Service Parts ID Label, and refer to RPO Code List (Encore) , RPO Code List (Encore) .

Each item in the list below represents topics covered in detail below.

  • Radio Circuit Operation
  • Information Display and Controls
  • Antenna System
  • Radio Reception
  • Speaker Operation
  • Audio Amplifier (If equipped)
  • Theft Deterrent
  • Bluetooth (UP9) (if equipped)
  • Applications (if equipped)
  • Auxiliary Audio Input Jack (If equipped)
  • USB Port (If equipped)
  • Navigation System Components and Features (if equipped)
  • OnStar
  • Steering Wheel Controls (If equipped)
  • Auto Volume Control

Radio Circuit Operation

Radio Power

The radio does not use a discrete ignition feed circuit for power moding. The power mode master provides the system power mode to the radio via serial data messages. The power mode master determines the system power mode by processing power mode information from ignition switch inputs. Serial data power modes supported by the radio are OFF, ACCESSORY, RUN, and CRANK REQUEST.

Radio Grounds

The vehicle harness provides a ground for the radio circuits. The radio may also be case grounded.

Radio Data Link Communication

The radio communicates with other modules via serial data.

Radio Audio Outputs

Each of the audio output channel circuits (+) and (-), at the radio have a DC bias voltage that is approximately one half of battery voltage. The audio being played on the system is produced by a varying AC voltage that is centered around the DC bias voltage on the same circuit. The AC voltage is what causes the speaker cone to move and produce sound. The frequency (Hz) of the AC voltage signal is directly related to the frequency of the input (audio source playing) to the audio system. Both the DC bias voltage and the AC voltage signals are needed for the audio system to properly produce sound.

Remote Enable Output

The remote enable circuit is a discrete 12 V signal supplied to infotainment system components when the radio is producing audio, needs the front display on, needs video entertainment system components on, or needs to produce chimes. This signal is used to control the power state of the components. There is no output on radio the remote enable circuit when the vehicle is in the CRANK powermode, this is to minimize current consumption from the attached modules and also to avoid audio pops during crank events.

Information Display and Controls

NOTE: Depending on vehicle equipment, the display may be separate from the radio and radio controls, or may be integrated into the radio chassis.

Navigation Radio Communications Diagram

Fig. 42: Navigation Radio Communications
Fig. 42: Navigation Radio Communications

Navigation Radio Communications Diagram

The info display module has continuous power and ground. When the radio is on, a discrete 12 V signal is supplied on the remote enable circuit to the color display module. This signal is used to control the power state of the module, which is active when the signal is high and inactive when the signal is low.

The info display module receives digital video data from the radio for on-screen display information through the video signal circuits. Backlighting dimming level is controlled by the radio through a pulse width modulated circuit. The output is determined by dimming level information the radio receives via serial data.

The radio controls communicate radio control inputs directly to the radio through the CAN Graphical Interface (CGI) data circuits. After receiving the message the radio will perform the requested function. Messages communicated between the radio and the radio controls include the following:

  • Button presses/knob rotations
  • Commands for the state of indicators
  • Radio control back-lighting

The HVAC controls are a separate component from the radio controls. HVAC data for controls and status indicators is communicated between the HVAC controls and the HVAC control module with a separate LIN serial data circuit. HVAC status screen information from the HVAC control module is transmitted to the radio on the GMLAN serial data circuit. The radio then displays the desired screen information on the info display using the video data circuits.

Antenna System

Multi-Band Antenna

The multi-band antenna is located on the roof of the vehicle. This type of antenna may be used with the AM/FM radio, but is primarily for cellular and GPS signals, if the vehicle has these features. Keep this antenna clear of snow and ice build up for clear reception. If the vehicle has a sunroof, the performance of the system may be affected if the sunroof is open. Loading items onto the roof of the vehicle can interfere with the performance of the system, ensure the multi-band antenna is not obstructed.

The radio antenna is enabled when the radio is turned on. The radio provides battery voltage to the antenna using the center conductor of the antenna coaxial cable. This DC voltage does not affect the incoming radio signal. When a 12 V signal is seen by the on the center conductor of the antenna coax, both AM and FM signals are amplified.

Radio Reception

AM/FM Radio Signal

The radio signal is sent from a broadcast station and is then received by an antenna. The strength of the signal received depends on the following:

  • The power output (wattage) of the broadcasting station
  • The location of the vehicle (or receiver) relative to the broadcast tower.
  • Height of the broadcast antenna
  • Height of the receiving antenna
  • Obstacles between the tower and the receiver
  • Atmospheric conditions
  • What band (AM or FM) the station is broadcasting
  • Type of antenna and the ground plane

Radio Data System (RDS)

The RDS feature is available only on FM stations that broadcast RDS information. This system relies upon receiving specific information from these stations and only works when the information is available. While the radio is tuned to an FM-RDS station, the station name or call letters display. RDS data is carried in what is known as a "subcarrier". A subcarrier is a frequency that the FM broadcaster is authorized to use to send data that is not audible in the main audio program.

RDS functions will only work with FM broadcast stations that are broadcasting RDS data. Not all FM Broadcast stations broadcast RDS data or offer all of the RDS services.

The information displayed is dependent upon the information broadcast by the particular station. The information may vary greatly between stations. RDS functions may not work properly when reception is weak, reception is of poor quality, or RDS is not implemented properly by the FM Broadcaster. In some cases, a radio station broadcasting incorrect information may cause the RDS features of the radio to appear to work improperly.

With RDS, the radio can do the following:

  • Display text information such as: station identification, type of programming, and general information (artist and song title, station messages, call in phone numbers, etc.).
  • Seek to stations broadcasting the selected type of programming
  • Receive announcements concerning local and national emergencies
  • Receive alert warnings of local or national emergencies. When an alert announcement comes on the current radio station, ALERT! displays. You will hear the announcement, even if the volume is low or a CD is playing. If a CD is playing, play stops during the announcement. Alert announcements cannot be turned off. ALERT! is not affected by tests of the emergency broadcast system. This feature is not supported by all RDS stations.

Speaker Operation

Speakers turn electrical energy into mechanical energy to move air, using a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The electromagnet is energized when the radio or amplifier (if equipped) delivers current to the voice coil on the speaker. The voice coil will form a north and south pole that will cause the voice coil and the speaker cone to move in relation to the permanent magnet. The current delivered to the speaker is rapidly changing alternating current (A/C). This causes the speaker cone to move in two directions producing sound.

Audio Amplifier (If equipped)

Amplifier Interface

A fused battery voltage circuit provides the main amplifier power. A switched 12 V output from the radio is used to control the power - state of the amplifier. To respond quickly to audio input and control signals, the amplifier is ON in all vehicle power modes except OFF and CRANK Request. The internal amplifier bridges are fully powered and unmuted when the amplifier receives the switched 12 V input.

Amplifier Operation

The purpose of the amplifier is to increase the power of a voltage or current signal. The output signal of an amplifier may consist of the same frequencies as the input signal or it may consist of only a portion of the frequencies as in the case of a subwoofer or midrange speaker. The radio creates a low level stereo audio output signal, which is sent at the user-defined volume level to the audio amplifier. The audio amplifier amplifies the signal and sends it to the appropriate speakers. Each of the audio output channel circuits (+) and (-), from the amplifier have a DC bias voltage that is approximately one half of battery voltage. The audio being played on the system is produced by a varying AC voltage that is centered around the DC bias voltage on the same circuit.

The AC voltage is what causes the speaker cone to move and produce sound. The frequency (Hz) of the AC voltage signal is directly related to the frequency of the input (audio source playing) to the audio system. Both the DC bias voltage and the AC voltage signals are needed for the audio system to properly produce sound.

Theft Deterrent

The radio theft deterrent system is intended to disable or limit radio functionality if incorrect vehicle information is received by the radio. The radio disables functionality if the VIN information received by the radio does not match the VIN information that has been learned by the radio. The radio receives this information via serial data. A possible cause of incorrect VIN info could be the radio was originally installed in another vehicle.

The radio has the following theft operating modes as part of the theft deterrent system:

  • Normal Mode: The radio has learned a correct VIN sequence and the VIN information received via serial data matches the learned VIN sequence. In this mode the radio has full functionality.
  • No VIN Mode: The radio has not received or learned a correct VIN sequence. In this mode the radio has limited functionality.
  • Theft Detected Mode: The radio has learned a correct VIN sequence and the VIN information received via serial data does NOT match the learned VIN sequence. In this mode the radio may be disabled or have limited functionality. The radio display will indicate that theft protection is active.

Bluetooth (UP9) (If equipped)

Bluetooth wireless technology is a short-range communications technology intended to replace the cables connecting portable and/or fixed devices while maintaining high levels of security. The operating range of the signal is approximately 30 feet.

The available features and functions are determined by the type of device and the software within the devices being used. For a feature or function to operate, it must be supported in both devices.

The first connection between devices is established through a process called pairing. In order to pair two devices, a password (passkey) has to be exchanged between the two devices. One device will generate the password, the other device accepts the password to complete the process. Once the devices are paired, future connections between the devices will occur automatically when the devices are on and within range of each other.

The Bluetooth hardware is internal to the radio. The radio supports streaming of data (music, voice, information) from cellular phones and other mobile devices that support those features. The radio may also be capable of interfacing with cellular phones for hands-free features.

  • The device must be paired to the radio to use the available Bluetooth feature(s). The pairing process must only be performed once for each device, unless that device's information is deleted.
  • Up to five devices can be paired to the system, but only one can be connected at any given time.
  • Streaming Audio allows playing music from the mobile device wirelessly. Music stored on the mobile device can be viewed and controlled from the display.
  • To stream audio from a mobile device, the device must be unlocked, and any additional applications should be closed.

Refer to the vehicle owners manual, supplements, and the device manufacturers information for pairing instructions.

Applications (If equipped)

When the system is equipped with Bluetooth , the system may be capable of using applications, commonly referred to as apps.

The term application refers to any piece of software that works on a system (hardware) that is being operated by it's own software. Applications are typically small software programs which uses the hardware to perform a specific task, as opposed to operating the entire system.

  • For an application to be used, it must be installed on both the vehicle infotainment system and a compatible mobile device.
  • The device must be connected to the system. this may be done wirelessly via Bluetooth , or via the vehicle USB port. Refer to the device manufacturers information for the proper connection method.
  • When the device is connected, the application on the radio is used to remotely access and control the application on the mobile device.
  • The application must work correctly on the device to work with the vehicle infotainment system.
  • The user may be required to log-in to the application on the mobile device before using the application from the vehicle controls.
  • Using applications will use the device's data plan.
  • The device must be unlocked, and any additional applications should be closed.

Refer to the owner's manual and supplements for information on mobile devices, control, and operation.

Auxiliary Audio Input Jack (If equipped)

The infotainment system may have a 3.5mm (1/8 in.) auxiliary audio input jack. The auxiliary audio input jack interfaces directly with the radio. When a portable audio playback device is connected to the auxiliary jack, an internal switch detects the connection and the radio will switch to AUX as the audio source. Audio signals from the device are sent to the radio from the auxiliary jack via the left, right, and common audio signal circuits.

  • When a device is first connected to the 3.5mm (1/8 in.) input jack the infotainment system automatically switches to that device. If an auxiliary device has already been connected, press the AUX or CD/AUX button to select the device.
  • Playback of an audio device that is connected to the 3.5mm jack can only be controlled using the controls on the device.
  • The volume control on the device may need to be adjusted to ensure sufficient playback volume through the infotainment system.

USB Port (If Equipped)

The infotainment system may have a USB connector. The USB connector interfaces directly with the radio. The USB connector supports both USB standards 1.1 and 2.0.

USB Supported Devices:

  • USB Flash Sticks (Thumb Drives)
  • Portable USB Hard Drives
  • Portable Digital Media Players (iPOD, ZUNE, etc)

Depending on the USB device, some devices may not be recognized, or some features/functions may not be able to be controlled with the radio controls. USB HUB devices are not supported.

Refer to the owner's manual for information on USB devices, control, and operation.

Navigation System Components and Features (if equipped)

The navigation system, if equipped, provides the following:

  • Connection to the global positioning system (GPS) antenna, which provides the vehicle position information.
  • Map data for navigation and map route guidance. Dependant on vehicle equipment, this data may be stored internally, or externally on an SD card connected to the radio via USB.
  • Route guidance with verbal prompts to the operator.
  • Traffic and weather information for display on the navigation system map (with active subscription, where available).

Global Positioning System (GPS) Antenna

The global positioning system (GPS) antenna is part of the multi-band antenna located on the roof of the vehicle. The GPS antenna is used to collect the signals of the orbiting GPS satellites. Within the antenna is housed a low noise amplifier that allows for a more broad and precise reception of this data. The GPS antenna amplifier is powered through the coaxial cable.

The antenna is connected to the navigation radio through a signal splitter. The signal splitter is a component for dividing the navigation signal into two paths without any transmission loss. This allows the use of a single GPS antenna to provide a signal to both the navigation radio and the telematics communication interface module.

SD Card Reader

When not equipped with internal storage, the navigation system has a USB port with SD card reader slot located in the center console. The USB port and the card reader slot interface with a hub device, internal to the auxiliary jack, USB, and memory card receptacle assembly . The internal hub device interfaces directly with the radio via a USB cable. The auxiliary jack, USB, and memory card receptacle assembly receives fused battery voltage and ground from the harness to power the internal hub device as well as providing additional amperage to power USB devices.

The system uses the SD Card to store map information. The map database SD card must be inserted in the console SD card reader slot for the navigation system to function. If the map database SD card cannot be accessed, navigation related selections will not be available to the infotainment system. The SD card reader is dedicated for map data only, no other file types are supported.

The system uses the SD Card to store map information. The map database SD card must be inserted in the console SD card reader slot for the navigation system to function. If the map database SD card cannot be accessed, navigation related selections will not be available to the infotainment system. The SD card reader is dedicated for map data only, no other file types are supported.

Route Guidance

The map will display the route to the selected destination. Voice prompts alert the operator of upcoming events (turns) and arrivals at the destination. The navigation system will automatically recalculate if the route is not followed. The navigation radio uses data received from the global positioning system (GPS) satellites, the vehicle speed signal. and serial data information to accurately display the current position of the vehicle.

Points of Interest

The map database provides point of interest information. Points of interests are locations that are frequently visited. Points of interest can be can be displayed on the map or set as a destination. The following are some of the available Points of interests:

  • Gas Station
  • Restaurant
  • College
  • Police Station

OnStar (If equipped)

When OnStar is activated, a serial data message is sent to the radio that activates a software program. When the software begins its process, the fade goes to the front, Bass and Treble are set to the mid range, the outputs are mono, and the audio source is OnStar. OnStar takes priority over any other audio source. All of these actions are preset values stored in the radio.

For additional OnStar information, refer to OnStar Description and Operation.

Steering Wheel Controls (If equipped)

Some audio functions are available using the steering wheel controls. The steering wheel controls duplicate the function of the primary controls available on the radio.

For additional information on steering wheel controls, refer to Steering Wheel Controls Description and Operation .

Auto Volume Control

With auto volume control, the audio system will adjust automatically to make up for road and wind noise as you drive, by increasing the volume as vehicle speed increases. To use auto volume control, set the volume at the desired level, and then select either Low, Medium, or High. To turn auto volume control off, select the Off screen button.

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